Family Green Cards

Family Immigration/Green Cards

The US immigration system allows certain individuals to sponsor their spouse, parents, children and siblings for permanent residency (green cards).  Below can be found basic information on the requirements.

Sponsoring a Spouse

Deciding to get married is a big enough step for anyone, but deciding to marry a foreign national will involve some additional legal steps you might not have thought about.  Speaking with an experienced immigration attorney to explain your different options will help put your mind at ease and make the process an enjoyable one!

  • If you’re a US Citizen

US citizens can petition either their fiancées or spouses for permanent residency.  Click here for more information on the fiancée visa process.

Once you are married to a foreign national, your spouse is considered an immediate relative, meaning there is no wait time (aside from normal processing times) to be able to request residency for your spouse.  Initially, the U.S. citizen spouse will file Form I-130 to establish U.S. citizenship status, that you are legally married to your spouse, and that your marriage is legitimate and not just for immigration purposes.

If your spouse is in the United States already, you may be eligible to file a one-step adjustment of status and include the I-485 application for residency at the same time you file the I-130 petition.  If your spouse is outside of the United States, once the I-130 petition is approved, they would then be able to immigrate to the US through consular processing in their home country while pursuing an immigrant visa.

Whether your spouse’s residency application or immigrant visa is approved depends on many factors, and your spouse is not guaranteed residency simply because he or she is married to you.  Did you prepare the petition correctly and submit the required supporting documents?  Is your relationship bona fide? Is your spouse “admissible” to the United States (re: previous immigration violations, criminal issues, etc.)? All of these factors should be taken into account when filing an application for your spouse.

  • If you’re a Permanent Resident

If you are a Permanent Resident petitioning your spouse, they will be placed in the F2A category of the US Department of State’s Visa Bulletin. As there is a numerical limit to the number of spouses of residents who can immigrate to the United States each year, there may be a period of time that the immigrant spouse will have to wait before being able to file for an immigrant visa or for an adjustment of status. The Visa Bulletin is a database of priority dates in various visa categories, and  you can check it here- https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/legal/visa-law0/visa-bulletin.html

To petition your spouse as a Permanent Resident, you first need to file Form I-130 to establish your relationship and priority date.  Once the priority date is current, your spouse can immigrate to the United States by either filing an I-485 application for residency (if they are in the US), or DS-260 application for an immigrant visa (if they are outside the US).  Keep in mind if your spouse wishes to pursue an adjustment of status in the US with form I-485, they must continually maintain legal status, have lawful presence, and not have worked without authorization, among other requirements for residency.

If you are interested in sponsoring your spouse, you should consult with an experienced family immigration attorney who can perform a thorough screening of your immigrant spouse’s immigration history to ensure a proper filing.

Sponsoring Parents

Only US citizens may sponsor their parents for Permanent Residency.  The US citizen son or daughter must be at least 21 years old at the time they sponsor their parent for citizenship.

Parents of US citizens are immediate relatives, meaning there is no wait time (aside from normal processing times) to be able to request residency for your parent, once you are 21 years or older.  However, it is important to keep in mind that being able to sponsor your parents for residency, and your parent being “admissible” to the United States for residency are two different components of the sponsorship process.  There are many factors that come into play, especially your parent’s immigration history, especially any entry or visa violations, their criminal history, and their manner of last entry into the United States.

If you are interested in sponsoring your parent for residency, you should consult with an experienced family immigration attorney who can do a who can perform a thorough screening of your immigrant parent’s immigration history to ensure a proper filing.

Sponsoring Children

Both US citizens and Permanent Residents can sponsor their children, who are minors or adults.  How quickly your child can immigrate to the United States greatly depends on their relationship to you, the visa bulletin, and their immigration history.

US citizens can petition their minor, unmarried children under the age of 21 as immediate relatives, their unmarried adult sons and daughters (F1 category), and their married sons and daughters (F3 category). Permanent Residents can petition their minor, unmarried children under the age of 21 (F2A category) and their unmarried adult sons and daughters (F2B category).  If the son or daughter of a Permanent Resident marries while awaiting a priority date, the petition is automatically cancelled and the beneficiary loses their priority date.

Filing Form I-130 is the petition that demonstrates the relationship between parent and child as well as establishes the priority date.  There is a numerical limitation on the number of children of US citizens and Permanent Residents that can immigrate to the United States each year.  The US Department of State’s Visa Bulletin is a database of priority dates in various visa categories, and you can check it here- https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/legal/visa-law0/visa-bulletin.html.

If you are interested in sponsoring your child for residency, you should consult with an experienced family immigration attorney who can do a thorough screening of their immigration history to ensure a proper filing.

Sponsoring Siblings

US citizens who are 21 years or older may sponsor their siblings for residency in the F4 category.  The siblings need only share one parent in common to qualify.

Filing Form I-130 is the petition that demonstrates the relationship between siblings as well as establishes the priority date.  There is a numerical limitation on the number of siblings of US citizens that can immigrate to the United States each year.  The US Department of State’s Visa Bulletin is a database of priority dates in various visa categories, and you can check it here- https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/legal/visa-law0/visa-bulletin.html

If you are interested in sponsoring your sibling for residency, you should consult with an experienced family immigration attorney who can do a who can perform a thorough screening of your immigrant sibling’s immigration history to ensure a proper filing.

Hear it from our clients

"We are a success story from Bashyam Shah. We first found out about this place through some friends on Facebook and reached out. Allison and Jessica took care of us from the beginning to the end, through all of the steps, through all of the questions, and all of the paperwork. Allison prepared us for the interview by offering a mock interview session with hypotheticals about how the interview could go, and just different things that we didn’t understand because we aren’t lawyers. They were very patient and they answered our questions in a timely fashion. Being a same-sex couple made us nervous and they helped us through that. Allison went to the interview with us to make sure no inappropriate/unfair questions were asked and she was re-assuring that things would be okay."

Jasper from USA

"I have been dealing with immigration stuff for a long time now and I have gone through different kind of visas and I have all these records. I was happy to have gone through Bashyam Shah because I feel there would have definitely been some stuff that would have fallen through the cracks. They helped us streamline the process."

Janghoon Y. from South Korea

"I am a Guatemalan immigrant that has lived in the United States for 14 years, and have personally experienced various immigration processes and adjustments through different administrations. When the time came to submit an adjustment of status petition for my parents, I knew I had to contact a trustworthy attorney that was knowledgeable in immigration law and would be able to give me peace of mind, especially during these trying times we are living. For this reason, after doing my homework and looking at different options, I decided to consult Attorney Allison. From the first moment, she understood my language, my situation, and that of my parents. Without a doubt, I knew we were in good hands. Her professionalism and excellent legal team she leads demonstrated that I had selected the best option. Our immigration process ended with success and my obtained their permanent residence. We are happy and grateful to have had Attorney Allison during this important process."


"The attorneys at this firm are excellent in every single way. They are so great that even at the American Embassy in Honduras, they told us the same thing. The person who interviewed us said that he liked how neatly they had put together all the documents. His exact words were “congratulations on the attorney you hired. They did a wonderful job.” So if the consulate said so, we say it twice as much! They are such great attorneys!!"

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